The martyrdom of leonard peltier for the american indians

After dropping out in the ninth grade,[ citation needed ] he returned to the Turtle Mountain Reservation to live with his father. He worked for several years and became the owner of an auto body station. In the city, Peltier became involved in a variety of causes championing Native American civil rights, and eventually joined the American Indian Movement.

The martyrdom of leonard peltier for the american indians

Transcript This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. On Monday, President Obama granted clemency to prisoners—the most individual acts of clemency granted in a single day by any president in U. Obama pardoned 78 people and shortened the sentences of others convicted of federal crimes.

He has now pardoned a total of people during his presidency and has shortened the sentences of 1, people, including serving life sentences. Most of the cases have involved people serving long sentences for nonviolent drug offenses.

According to the White House, Obama has commuted more sentences than the last 11 presidents combined. But Obama has taken no action on several of the most high-profile prisoners seeking pardons or clemency.

The martyrdom of leonard peltier for the american indians

This is a video from Amnesty International, which has been pushing for President Obama to grant Leonard Peltier clemency. This video is narrated by actor Peter Coyote.

I am everyone who ever died without a voice or a prayer or a hope or a chance. Leonard Peltier is a Native American activist who has been in prison for 40 years, serving two consecutive life terms for a crime he maintains he did not commit.

Peltier was a member of the American Indian Movement, AIM, founded in during the civil rights movement to advocate for the rights of Native Americans. The murders occurred at a time when AIM supporters and residents of Pine Ridge were being intimidated and killed, allegedly by paramilitaries connected to the government.

A climate of fear and terror prevailed. Leonard Peltier has spent 40 years in federal penitentiaries, often in solitary confinement. He is now 71 years old and in rapidly declining health. The man needs medical treatment. He needs to have access to medical treatment.

That last voice was Bruce Smith, a former prison guard who worked at Leavenworth federal prison, where he met Leonard Peltier. Peltier is now imprisoned in Florida. He survived the Pine Ridge shootout. Martin Garbus, lay out the case.

He was convicted in He was involved in the Wounded—shortly after the Wounded Knee shootout. The evidence in the case, acknowledged by the government and acknowledged by the federal judges, is that the FBI does not know who shot the two people, that the ballistics do not support the argument that Leonard Peltier did it.

The important thing at this time, for your listeners, is to write to the president.

Warrior, The Life of Leonard Peltier () is a feature documentary film about Peltier's life, the American Indian Movement, and his trial directed by Suzie Baer. The film argues that the government's prosecution of Peltier was unjust and motivated by the hugely profitable energy interests in the area. Take the only tree that’s left, Stuff it up the hole in your culture. —Leonard Cohen Retreat to the desert, and fight. —D. H. Lawrence. Peltier is a former member of the American Indian Movement who was convicted of killing two FBI agents during a shootout on South Dakota s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in .

Amnesty International has a site which allows you to join their petition. Overpeople thus far have joined the petition. There are aboutadditional letters.

And explain what that conduct was.

FAIR USE NOTICE

The wrongful conduct was—and the government acknowledges at this point—using false affidavits, both in the case and to extradite him from Canada, where he had been led. In this particular case, two other people were charged for the case, convicted—murder. Both of those people were found innocent.

The martyrdom of leonard peltier for the american indians

And he would have been tried alongside them, but he had fled to Canada. So he was extradited and tried separately. But the proof against the other defendants was that it was their guns, etc. And what was that wrongful conduct? The other wrongful conduct was it was they who got the false affidavits, acknowledged to be false and found by the court to be false.

So, the only reason he was convicted was, A, the political atmosphere of the time, and, two, they succeeded, the government, in having the case tried before a judge, a very anti-Indian judge, rather than the judge who was involved in the acquittal of the other two defendants.

I wanted to turn to Leonard Peltier in his own words, describing what happened at Pine Ridge on June 26,the day when the two FBI agents were shot dead.

[BINGSNIPMIX-3

That next day, when it came down, I was down into the camp, and I heard some shooting going on up over by the ranch house. I used to hear shooting there. We used to hear shooting there every day.Peltier is a former member of the American Indian Movement who was convicted of killing two FBI agents during a shootout on South Dakota s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in .

His story is told within the context of the the martyrdom of leonard peltier for the american indians American Indian. Obama Urged to Grant the martyrdom of leonard peltier for the american indians Clemency to Native American Activist Jailed pay for business movie review for 40 Years.

the apocalyptic Hiralal salifies, his stimulants goof sprays intractably. Warrior, The Life of Leonard Peltier () is a feature documentary film about Peltier's life, the American Indian Movement, and his trial directed by Suzie Baer.

The film argues that the government's prosecution of Peltier was unjust and motivated by the hugely profitable energy interests in the area. “All the Indians who were there that day were warriors,” Matthiessen writes, “and the nameless figures in the pickup truck were no more guilty than [Peltier] and Dino and Leonard, because no Indian that day was guilty.” This was the Indian perspective on that fateful day and “increasingly” his own.

Nonetheless, Mr. Peltier’s case is widely viewed throughout Indian Country and beyond as emblematic of the worldview and prejudices of the s and s against Native Americans. Leonard Peltier is an imprisoned Native American considered by Amnesty International, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, National Congress of American Indians, the Robert F.

Kennedy Memorial Center for Human Rights, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Rev. Jesse Jackson, among many others, to be a political prisoner who should be immediately.

Leonard Peltier - Wikipedia