Understanding the classical conditioning and operant conditioning

May 15, Classical conditioning vs operant conditioning? What exactly are the differences between these two types of learning. Use this study guide to familiarize yourself with some of the major topics related to classical and operant conditioning including key terminology and important thinkers.

Understanding the classical conditioning and operant conditioning

Classical conditioning has become important in understanding human and animal behavior. Learn how it works and explore a few examples. What's Difference Between the Classical and Operant Conditioning? Article. See How an Unconditioned Stimulus Can Create a Learned Response. Article. Operant conditioning. According to behaviourism, all behaviour is learned and maintained by its consequences. B. F. Skinner (–) devised apparatus and methods for studying these effects. The other understanding of phobias is operant conditioning. While classical conditioning creates an association between two stimuli, operant conditioning is based on a system of reward and punishment.

Learning Theory and Learning Theory "Learning Theory" is a discipline of psychology that attempts to explain how an organism learns. It consists of many different theories of learning, including instincts, social facilitation, observation, formal teaching, memory, mimicry, and classical and operant conditioning.

It is these last two that are of most interest to animal trainers. Why should animal trainers be bothered with learning the theory behind how their animals learn?

Many excellent trainers have no formal schooling or organized understanding of how their training is effective or how their charges work. But training is both an art and a science.

Understanding the classical conditioning and operant conditioning

So trainers are learning the theory of learning theory! The gist of the experiment is this: Pavlov presented dogs with food, and measured their salivary response how much they drooled. Then he began ringing a bell just before presenting the food.

At first, the dogs did not begin salivating until the food was presented. After a while, however, the dogs began to salivate when the sound of the bell was presented.

They learned to associate the sound of the bell with the presentation of the food. As far as their immediate physiological responses were concerned, the sound of the bell became equivalent to the presentation of the food. Classical conditioning is used by trainers for two purposes: To condition train autonomic responses, such as the drooling, producing adrenaline, or reducing adrenaline calming without using the stimuli that would naturally create such a response; and, to create an association between a stimulus that normally would not have any effect on the animal and a stimulus that would.

Stimuli that animals react to without training are called primary or unconditioned stimuli US. They include food, pain, and other "hardwired" or "instinctive" stimuli. Animals do not have to learn to react to an electric shock, for example. Stimuli that animals react to only after learning about them are called secondary or conditioned stimuli CS.

These are stimuli that have been associated with a primary stimulus. After its sound was associated with the presentation of food, it became a conditioned stimulus. If a warning buzzer is associated with the shock, the animals will learn to fear it.

Secondary stimuli are things that the trainee has to learn to like or dislike. Examples include school grades and money. A slip of paper with an "A" or an "F" written on it has no meaning to a person who has never learned the meaning of the grade.

Understanding the classical conditioning and operant conditioning

Yet people have been known to work hard to gain this secondary reinforcer. See an interactive visual guide to CC here - and an amusing take on classical conditioning here.

Application Classical conditioning is very important to animal trainers, because it is difficult to supply an animal with one of the things it naturally likes or dislikes in time for it to be an important consequence of the behavior. Some trainers call this a bridge because it bridges the time between when the animal performs a desired behavior and when it gets its reward.

Marine mammal trainers use a whistle. Many other trainers use a clicker, a cricket-like box with a metal tongue that makes a click-click sound when you press it. You can classically condition a clicker by clicking it and delivering some desirable treat, many times in a row. Simply click the clicker, pause a moment, and give the dog or other animal the treat.

Some clicker trainers call this "charging up the clicker". The click sound becomes a signal for an upcoming reinforcement. Read more about how to get started with clicker training here.

Operant Conditioning Classical conditioning forms an association between two stimuli. Operant conditioning forms an association between a behavior and a consequence.Classical and operant conditioning are two important concepts central to behavioral psychology.

While both result in learning, the processes are quite different. The other understanding of phobias is operant conditioning. While classical conditioning creates an association between two stimuli, operant conditioning is based on a system of reward and punishment.

The research by Bartlett () is identified in the Specification along with the concept of schemas. You need to understand these concepts and evaluate them, . Classical Conditioning, along with Operant Conditioning (hopefully I will have an opportunity to write about that later), also help correct maladaptive behavior by breaking previous NS-US associations (you will understand this by the end of this post, I hope) and creating new ones.

Understanding classical and operant conditioning provides psychologists with many tools for understanding learning and behavior in the world outside the lab.

This is in part because the two types of learning occur continuously throughout our lives. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The digit and digit formats both work.

Classical conditioning - Wikipedia